Leong Yoon Pin 梁荣平

Introduction

Leong Yoon Pin 梁荣平 (b. 5 August 1932, Singapore–d. 13 April 2011, Singapore) was a composer, conductor and educator. Described as the doyen of Singapore composers, Leong was well-known for his choral compositions, many of which were locally commissioned and performed by both amateur and professional choirs. His compositions were often infused with a local flavour. Leong was awarded the Cultural Medallion in 1982.

© Eric Foo Chee Meng, 1979-2001. All rights reserved.
Courtesy of the National Arts Council.
Retrieved from PictureSG.

This resource guide serves to help users locate resources on Leong Yoon Pin available at the National Library Singapore as well as the following organisations: LASALLE College of the Arts (LASALLE), Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA), National Archives of Singapore (NAS), National Institute of Education Library (NIE) and National University of Singapore (NUS).

Library Codes

NL: National Library (Lee Kong Chian Reference Library)
PL: Public Libraries, National Library Board
NAS: National Archives of Singapore
RU: Repository Used Collection, National Library Board
LASALLE: LASALLE College of the Arts
NAFA: Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts
NIE: National Institute of Education
NUS: National University of Singapore

 

Search Terms Call Numbers
Music education 780.7
Choral/vocal music 782.5
Orchestral music 784.2
 Piano music 786.2

Books

(listed in alphabetical order)

  • Abisheganaden, P. (2005). Notes across the years: Anecdotes from a musical life (pp. 68-71). Singapore: Unipress, Center for the Arts.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2092 ABI
    Abisheganaden recounts Leong’s formation of the Metro Philharmonic Society (MPS) in 1959, where he was invited to be Patron of the Society. Though Leong was founding member, he did not run the MPS autonomously, but also invited other conductors and composers to contribute to the Society’s activities. MPS also played an important role in premiering new works, many of which were Leong’s choral works. The author also brings up the subject of government support in the arts scene.

 

  • Chia, W. K. (2006). Chinese choirs. In T. Koh, et al. (Eds.), Singapore: The encyclopedia (p. 106). Singapore: Editions Didier Millet.
    Call no.: RSING 959.57003 SIN
    This essay traces the tradition of choral singing in Singapore, from its early years in 1819 when Stamford Raffles founded Singapore, to the new millennium. Chia situates the development of choral singing within Singapore’s religious, social, educational, and political environments, with the latter bearing the most significance. According to Chia, the Sino-Japanese war in the 1930s helped foster strong links between the Chinese communities in Singapore and China, and engendered much anti-Japanese sentiment as evident in the songs and lyrics sung by a growing number of choirs in Singapore. In addition to a brief comparison of different choral styles, Chia assesses the vocal quality and choral sound of Chinese choirs. Leong’s musical contributions and his involvement with the Metro Philharmonic Society are also mentioned.

 

  • Koh-Baker, J. (2002). Music culture in Singapore. In The Japan Federation of Composers (Ed.), Asian composers in the 20th century (pp. 285-295). Tokyo: Nihon Sakkyokuka Kyogikai.
    Call No.: No holdings in NL (Available in NIE and NAFA Library)
    This essay is a survey of the musical culture of Singapore in the twentieth century. Koh-Baker also devotes a short paragraph each to such composers as Leong Yoon Pin, Phoon Yew Tien, Kelly Tang, Ho Chee Kong, and others. She introduces Leong as the pioneer of Singaporean composers and lists a few of his more significant works, as well as his achievements.

 

  • Leong Yoon Pin (2006). In T. Koh, et al. (Eds.), Singapore: The encyclopedia (p. 106). Singapore: Editions Didier Millet.
    Call no.: RSING 959.57003 SIN
    A brief biography of Leong listing some of his representative works, his Singapore Symphony Orchestra (SSO) Composer-in-Residence attachment in 2001, and the Cultural Medallion win in 1982.

 

  • 李明明. [Li, M. M.] (1998). 五线不了情: 新加坡音乐家访谈 [The interviews of Singapore musicians] (p. 83-99). 新加坡 [Singapore]: SNP Publishing.
    Call no.: RSING 780.92 LMM
    This interview, conducted in Chinese, was done just after Leong completed his opera Bunga Mawar. It is biographical in nature, with personal observations on the part of the author. It is significant in that it also contains insights on Leong’s compositional habits and how he revises his works, for example, The Peacock’s East-Southerly Flight was first written for three parts, but later rewritten for four parts to achieve a fuller texture more suitable for the performance venue.

 

  • Peters, J. (1995). Singapore. In R. P. Santos (Ed.), The musics of ASEAN (pp. 191-232). ASEAN Committee on Culture and Information.
    Call no.: RSING 781.62 MUS
    For Peters, Singapore’s musical fabric is a juxtaposition of cultures of Asia against a “dominant and unrelenting occidental musical presence”. Peters further introduces the variety of traditional music in Singapore, which include Malay, Chinese, and Indian music. In the section on western-based compositions, Leong’s use of 20th-century compositional techniques in Largo and Vivace is given a paragraph (p.217). Peters also surveys local compositions that were presented in New Music Forum. These include Leong’s Strands for chamber orchestra, Sketches for oboe and piano, Interfusion for piano quintet, and others (pp.219-21). The statistics taken from Census (1991) are dated.

 

  • Phan, M. Y. (2002). Leong Yoon Pin. In V. Purushothaman (Ed.), Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979 – 2001 (pp. 98-99). Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR
    In this National Arts Council publication dedicated to Cultural Medallion Recipients (1979-2001), Phan introduces Leong as a Cultural Medallion Recipient who has made a mark on musical development in Singapore. This two-page essay is structured in a question and answer (Q&A) format, with Leong responding to questions such as the inspiration for his works to his role as a musical pioneer in Singapore.

 

  • Phoon, Y. T. (2002). Leong Yoon Pin. In K. W. Kwok, A. Mahizhnan & T. Sasitharan (Eds.), Selves: The state of the arts in Singapore (pp. 204-205). Singapore: National Arts Council, 2002.
    Call no.: RSING 700.95957 SEL
    This is a brief discussion of Leong’s five decades of musical contributions from a composer’s perspective. The author was a composition student of Leong. As to Leong’s compositional style, Phoon draws parallels with Russian nationalists such as Borodin and Tchaikovsky to the more recent Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

 

  • Soh, K. C., & Leong, Y. P. (1984). Active approach to music-making (Kodaly-based): A summative evaluation. Singapore: Institute of Education.
    Call no.: No holdings in NL (Available in NIE Library)
    This is essentially a survey-based evaluation of the revised 1984 music text Active Approach to Music-Making (Module 1) for local primary schools. A questionnaire was answered by seventy teachers from twenty eight Pilot and Non-Pilot schools and the findings were published in this book.

 

  • Tan, B. (2002). Sounding board: Music and cultural heritage. In V. Purushothaman (Ed.), Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979 – 2001 (pp.80-83). Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR
    Tan briefly traces the musical beginnings of Singapore, providing a context to the awarding of the Cultural Medallion for musicians from the first winners Choo Hoey and David Lim Kim San in 1979, to the first composer Leong Yoon Pin in 1982, and others. In addition, choral music, Asian music cultures, and Singapore’s musical future are broached.

 

  • Tan, S. E. (2002). Notes from a small island: A review of recent musical traditions. In K. W. Kwok, A. Mahizhnan & T. Sasitharan (Eds.), Selves: The state of the arts in Singapore (pp. 28-47). Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 700.95957 SEL
    Tan approaches her topic from both political and ethnological perspectives. Wide in scope, she considers the government’s role in shaping the local music scene through sponsorship schemes, Singapore’s colonial baggage, cultural identity, various ethnic music, and also discusses popular and rock music in the local scene, amongst others. Leong is mentioned briefly in relation to his compositions that were performed by the Singapore Symphony Orchestra (SSO) and Singapore Lyric Opera (SLO).

 

  • Ting, C. S., Leong, Y. P., & Tan, B. (1991). Singapore. In H. Ryker (Ed.), New music in the orient: Essays on composition in Asia since World War II (pp. 97-114). Buren, Netherlands: Frits Knuf Publishers.
    Call no.: RSING 780.95 NEW
    This chapter discusses compositional practices prior to Singapore’s independence, musical institutions after 1965, Singapore composers and their work, music in the 1980s, and the composer in Singapore society. Leong’s music is briefly discussed in the last section on Singaporean composers (pp.105-107). These include Largo and Vivace for string orchestra, Dance Suite for orchestra, Songs of the Phoenix for choir and orchestra, and the tone poem Episode from Journey to the West for orchestra with Chinese percussion instruments.

 

Theses and Writings

  • Lee, K. H. B. (2008). Leong Yoon Pin’s Sunset from a transcultural and postcolonial perspective. Unpublished B.A. dissertation, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts.
    Call no.: No holdings in NL (Available in NAFA Library)
    Lee explores the aspect of intercultural musical synthesis in Leong’s compositions, in particular, the choral work Sunset (2005) written for the Singapore Youth Festival. He also considers factors such as Singapore’s colonial heritage and the consequent decolonization effects on Leong’s musical style. Lee looks at cultural theories in his concluding analysis and interpretation of Sunset, suggesting that Leong’s awakening to Asian consciousness and consequent attempt to bridge cultural disparities resulted in a distinctive musical pluralism evident in Sunset.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1977). The creation of instrumental group programmes based on Asian thematic content for children learning musical Instruments in school (M.Ed. thesis, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 1977).
    Call no.: No holdings in NL (Available in NIE Library)
    This is Leong’s M.Ed. thesis, almost 600 pages in length. The first part is an exposition of the objectives of the thesis, which is supplemented with extensive musical examples for supporting activities. The three chapters include “Elements and factors contributing to the composition of the program”, “Reinforcement in related activities”, and “Programs”.

 

  • Tay, A. (2006). Leong Yoon Pin and his choral music: Singapore’s choral legacy. Unpublished B.A. thesis, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts.
    Call no.: No holdings in NL (Available in NAFA Library)
    This essay grew out of a research project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of BA (Hons) in Music at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (2006). Tay provides a biography of Leong, as well as analyses selected choral works such as Dragon Dance, Pedlars and the Soprano, Like a Rapid Stream, and Nightmare.

 

Newspapers and Journals

(listed in chronological order)

  • Loy, D. (1980, February 4). The SSO is back from the doldrums. The Business Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    A review of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra concert which premiered Leong’s Dayong Sampan. There is brief mention of Leong ’s “expansive and appealing” work which incorporates a Malay folk tune.

 

  • Emmanuel, G. (1980, February 5). Careful attention paid to finer points of style. New Nation, p. 23. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This review of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra’s performance in 1980 includes the premier of Leong’s Dayong Sampan, with conductor Ronly-Riklis. Amongst other things, Emmanuel suggests a resemblance to Stravinsky, a blend of East and West, and late Romantic harmony in Leong’s orchestral overture Dayong Sampan.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1985). Recent development in the contemporary music scene in Singapore. Performing Arts, 2, 50-52.
    Call no.: RSING 790.205 PA
    In this publication of The Singapore National Theatre Trust, Leong provides a brief introduction of local composers and their representative works. This essay was first written for the Asia Pacific Festival and Composers’ Conference in New Zealand in 1984. Leong comments on the first generation Singaporean composers, most of whom were self-taught or trained in other disciplines.
    The second part of the essay discusses the developing musical scene in Singapore schools and the cultural environment. Leong concludes with his thoughts on the imminent problems faced by local composers in the 1980s. This magazine existed briefly between the years of 1984 to 1991, and publication ceased after the opening of the National Arts Council.

 

  • 迪安 [Di‘an] (1987, October 23). 我听荣平30年 [I listened to Yoon Pin for 30 years]. 联合早报 [Lianhe Zaobao], p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Writer Soh Kay Cheng, a retired professor from the National Institute of Education, assumed the pen name of DiAnn when he wrote this article for Leong’s 青春颂歌 concert on 25 October at Victoria Concert Hall. This article traces the development of Leong’s compositional style over three decades. The writer associates the composer’s musical training and various professional affiliations with the changes in style, from his early period prior to 1954, through to his Guildhall, France, and Newcastle periods. It is also suggested that in later years, Leong was able to assimilate both his vocal and instrumental styles. DiAnn surmises that it is the instrumental compositions, with its combination of eastern melodies and western modernity that truly reflect Leong’s maturing style in the 1980s.

 

  • Kong, L. (1990, May 30). Songs for the folks. The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Leong discusses his compositional habits, like preferring to work in the early hours of the morning while the world is “still and calm”. As in other interviews, Leong maintains that it is vital for a composer to be creative. This leads him to experiment with sound combinations and to “trying out new structures and ideas”. He further shares that the sources of his inspiration include Chinese classical literature, ethnic sounds, and art songs.

 

  • Teo, T. S. (1990, October 12). Chopstick feastThe Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This is a preview of a concert presented by the Metro Philharmonic Society. Leong presents his work The Giving Tree, which calls for nearly a thousand chopsticks as percussion instruments. Based on the American fable by Shel Silverstein, Leong decided on the use of chopsticks as they are made of wood, and thus its association with the tree. Baritone Li Xinchang confessed being ‘bewildered by technical complexities, such as the augmented melodic movements of the work”.

 

  • Kong, L. (1991, November). The status of classical music composition in Singapore. Arts on campus, 1(3).
    Call no.: RSING 700.5 AC
    Kong assesses the classical music environment in Singapore during the 1990s, and solicits comments from composers such as Leong, Bernard Tan, Joe Peters, and Er Yenn Chwen. She further offers suggestions on how to make local compositions more accessible to the public, which would in turn give due recognition to the composer.

 

  • Guan, L. (1993, February 25). Joys of springThe Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This is a preview of Spring Songs, a concert given by the Metro Philharmonic Choir. Leong directs the choir in eleven songs that he had arranged for this performance. Instead of a piano, he uses the synthesizer as an accompaniment for its varied and interesting timbre. Other choral works on the programme included Nostalgia, Poem, and Dragon Dance. Leong also discusses the local choral scene and other works he has written for choir.

 

  • Leong, W. K. (1993, October 4). Composer Leong’s CD a firstThe Straits Times, p. 15. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    The writer introduces the National Arts Council’s (NAC) new programme to document Singaporean works in music and the visual and performing arts. The CD Symphonic Works of Leong Yoon Pin was the NAC’s first project, undertaken with the annual budget of $100,000. Produced by Naxos and performed by the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, the recorded works include Giocoso–Largamente, Overture “Dayong Sampan”, Largo–Vivace, Episodes in Journey to the West, Temasekian, and Metamorphosis.

 

  • Phan, M. Y. (1994, February 9). Israeli conductor who asked for Singapore musicThe Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This is more an obituary for well-known Israeli conductor Shalom Ronly-Riklis, who was awarded the Public Service Star in 1992 for his promotion of musical activities in Singapore. Leong recalls that it was Ronly-Riklis who asked for a Singaporean work to conduct when he was guest conductor with SSO in 1980. This prompted Choo Hoey to ask for a composition from Leong, who obliged with the Dayong Sampan, the first work by a Singaporean to be performed by the SSO.

 

  • Seah, L. (1997, June 5). The making of a Singaporean opera: How idea for an opera blossomed into The RoseThe Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Seah previews Leong’s first opera Bunga Mawar, a collaboration with Edwin Thumboo, who wrote the libretto. This article traces the genesis of this opera, which began as an initiative by the directors of the Singapore Lyric Opera, to the rehearsals with director Halliday and conductor Lim Yau, leading to its premiere performance during the Festival of Asian Performing Arts on 6 June 1997. For the review, see Sonny Lim’s (1997, June 10) A bold enterprise which boasts many strengths in The Straits Times.

 

  • Tan, S. E. (1999, March 22). Classical divide: Support S’pore talent or lose it. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Tan investigates this altercation between SSO and Singaporean composers, set off by Shui Lan’s provocative comment that Singaporean composers “did not meet international standards”. Opinions were gathered from the local music community as well as from Singaporeans based overseas. In two short paragraphs, Leong shares his view on whether preferential treatment should be given to Singaporean artistes, arguing that local works should not be judged from a western perspective. He maintains that there should be a deliberate creation of space to expose and discover young musicians.

 

  • Chia, H-L. (2000, February-March). Life of a composer: Leong Yoon Pin. The Arts, 17-20.
    Call no.: RSING 700.5 A
    This interview-style article explores Leong’s compositional outlook. Questions such as Leong’s preferred medium, the relationship between composer, conductor and the audience, Singapore’s musical identity, etc. are put forth. This article also includes a brief timeline from 1948 to 1982, a list of commissioned works from 1980 to 1999, and Leong’s compositional oeuvre from 1953-1987 (the latter in Chinese and without translation).

 

  • Ee, J. (2000, April 25). GK Goh chief pledges S$60,000 for SSO schemeThe Business Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Essentially a publicity article for GK Goh and the SSO’s Composer-in-Residence scheme. Leong was nominated as the first Composer-in-Residence, and will be paid $20,000 for one major commissioned work to be performed by the SSO in a public performance. Read Felicia Yap and Kenneth Lee’s (2000, June 17) Songs from Far Away in Business Times, for Singaporean composers’ comments on the local music scene.

 

  • 梁荣平 [Liang, R. P.] (2000). 漫谈新加坡本土音乐创作的源泉 [Discussing the origins of Singapore’s local compositions]. 南洋艺术 [Nanyang Arts], May-July, 52-53.
    Call no.: RSING 700.5 NA
    In this Chinese essay, Leong argues that Singapore does not yet have a common style as our ancestors from China, India, Malaysia, and Indonesia were preoccupied with survival issues and did not attempt to preserve their individual cultures. However, when Singapore became a British colony, we imported their musical traditions and forsook our own. To reclaim his roots, Leong draws upon Chinese folk elements, literature and poetry for inspiration. He also explores local and foreign poetry for subject matter. He cites his use of traditional instruments to add flavour to his compositions.

 

  • Van, P. Y. (2000, June 5). Leong Yoon Pin’s signature framed sound picturesThe Business Times, p. 24. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    A review of Leong’s Feasting in the Woods, performed by the SSO. Van highlights Leong’s penchant to frame sound pictures, “which change subtly with instrumental grouping”. She also infers the work’s programmatic content through the composer’s use of instrumental timbres.

 

  • Chew, G. (2000, July-August). Music in the making. Esplanade: The Arts Magazine, 28-29.
    Call no.: RSING 791.095957 E
    This is essentially publicity for the launch of the SSO’s Composers-in-Residence Scheme—a scheme made possible by the benefactors Mr and Mrs Goh Geok Khim. Leong was the choice composer of the Selection Committee. Shui Lan compares the then local music scene to “America in the early twentieth century where they were still unsure of their own musical identity and played more European music . . . this is a step forward for local music and composition . . .”. See further Tan Shzr Ee’s article in The Straits Times (1999, March 22). Classical divide: Support S’pore talent or lose it.

 

  • Chang, T. L. (2001). The world of Leong Yoon Pin. Bravissimo!: The quarterly newsletter of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, 2(2).
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    In this interview, Leong discusses his earliest musical influences, his compositional career and compositional process, Singaporean composers, and the gestation of his symphonic poem Gegentala (2001), a work commissioned by the Singapore Symphony Orchestra. This is an in-house publication of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra.

 

  • Ng, Y. F. (2001, May 24). Building up to Ravel rapture. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.
    A review of the SSO Gala Concert which featured soprano Barbara Hendricks singing Mozart and Berlioz, and the world premiere of Leong’s symphonic poem Gegentala. Calling the work “complex and musically dense”, writer Ng notes that the composer drew inspiration from the people and landscape of Inner Mongolia. Other than the “dazzlingly successful” finale, Ng found the work tentative and mostly “drowned in the haphazard dashes and splatters of orchestral colour”.

 

  • 蔡慧琨 [Cai, H. K.] (2006, November 8). 新加坡的华文合唱活动 [The Activities of Chinese Chorus in Singapore]. 福建艺术 Fujian Arts, 5, 50-51. Retrieved May 26, 2017, from 中国数字化期刊全文数据库 [Wanfang China Online Journals].
    Though similar in content to his article in Singapore: the encyclopedia, Chia’s article for Fujian Arts is nevertheless more comprehensive.

 

  • Chew, D. (2006, December 27). Kampung notesToday, pp. 40-41. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This interview was conducted as a preview for Leong’s Piano Concerto that was to be premiered in January 2007. The composer also described how his earliest songs were borne out of the necessity of writing music that was not politically affiliated with China or Taiwan. This led to his investigation and fascination with the local soundscape of Indian labourers at work or the “tok tok mee” man.

 

  • Cheong, S.-W. (2007, January 9).  SSO’s magnificent birthday concert. The Straits Times, Life! p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    The Singapore Symphony Orchestra and Shui Lan performed the world premiere of Leong’s Piano Concerto, with Lim Yan as soloist. Cheong offers a more extended commentary of the Concerto. She raises the point about the unpredictability of the melodic thread in the first movement and Leong’s chordal experiments. However, the performance of the finale was more compelling, and includes a quotation of the Malay folk ditty Ikan Kekek.

 

  • 胡文雁 [Hu, W. Y.] (2009, June 9).  本地作曲界先锋梁荣平: 作曲没有退休 [There is no retirement in composing songs]. 联合早报 Lianhe Zaobao. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    This article talks about the musical journey of Leong of how he became a musician, his first composition and almost half a century of music writing, and his continuous drive to write music as long as there is a demand and he has the stamina to do so.

 

 

  • 周文龙 & 王舒杨 [Zhou, W. L. & Wang, S. Y.] (2011, April 14). 没有他就没有今日新加坡音乐: 音乐界人士惋惜梁荣平逝世 [There wouldn’t be today’s Singapore music without him: music industry players remember Leong Yoon Pin]. 联合早报 Lianhe Zaobao. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
    Singapore music industry players Zechariah Goh (吴多才), Tan Ngian Hong (陈仰丰), Choo Thiam Siew (朱添寿), Quek Yong Siu (郭永秀) and Lee Yuk Chuan (李煜传) shares about Leong’s contribution, character and passion in this tribute to Leong on his passing.

 

Audio and Video Recordings (Interviews)

  • Chou, C. (Interviewer). (1994, June 4). Oral history interview with Leong Yoon Pin [MP3 Recording no. 001490/04/01-04]. Retrieved July 11, 2017, from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline.
    In 1994, researcher Cindy Chou conducted a one and a half hour interview with Leong for a Special Project (Music). Leong’s early childhood and family background, professional career and affiliations, compositional style, and the local music scene were topics of discussion. Transcript available.

 

  • Sng, S. (Interviewer). (2004, October 8 – 2006, October 23). Oral history interview with Bernard Tan Tiong Gie [MP3 Recording 002893/105/02, 31, 60, 62 – 65, 68, 87]. Retrieved July 11, 2017, from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline.
    An audio interview with Bernard Tan, whose discussion of the Singapore music scene include Leong’s involvement with amateur and professional groups in the 1950s, a comparison of English and Chinese choral societies, Leong’s conducting career, and Singapore politics in the 1950s, amongst others. The interview was conducted over an extended period of time.

 

  • Tan, E. A. L. (Interviewer). (2007, April 12 & 13).  Leong Yoon Pin, Cultural Medallion Recipient, 1982 Music [DVD]. Singapore: National Library Board Singapore.
    Call no.: RSING 780.92 LEO (Also available on National Online Repository of the Arts (NORA))
    The 1982 Cultural Medallion Recipient for music, Leong Yoon Pin, relates how he started working life as a primary school teacher, how he got interested in music and composing, as well as wide-ranging topics such as conducting, his works, his involvement with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra. The video also includes notes of appreciation from admirers.

 

Sound Recordings: Choral Works

(in chronological order)

  • Leong, Y. P. (1998). Dragon dance. A cappella [CD]. Singapore: The Philharmonic Choral Society.
    Call no.: No holdings in NL (Available in NAFA Library)
    Recorded live at the Palazzo dei Congressi, Riva del Garda, Italy on 7 April 1998., this piece 《舞龙》 uses the human voice to mimic music for dragon dances. Performed by The Philharmonic Chorus Singapore, conducted by Lim Yau.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 雄心 [Aspiration]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 程文恺 about nature and giving. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 微弱 [Counting the stars]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 方玮德. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 早安啊大地 [Good morning motherland]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 三发. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 生活是多么广阔 [Life is like the ocean]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 何其芳 about how life is as wide as the ocean and to live life to the fullest with passion. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 我愿意是急流 [Like a rapid stream]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG and NORA)
    Based on a poem by Hungarian poet Sandor Petof (1823-1849), translated by Sun Yong (孙用). The poem is set to music for an 8-part double chorus by Leong Yoon Pin in 1981 at the invitation of Lim Yau. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 马林百列 [Marine Parade]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 谢清 about Marine Parade by the sea. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 洗琉琅 [Mendulang]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 曹莽 about women who worked as dulang (tin pan) washers to extract tin, a dominant industry in Malaya at one time. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 歌唱高山和大海 [Of mountains & seas]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 灿煌, praising the beauty of mountains and seas. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 蓝蓝的海 [The sea is blue]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 周粲 and 郑民威. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 我为少男少女们歌唱 [Singing for my lads and lasses]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 何其芳 about the hope of youth. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (1998). 快把这地球扫一扫 [Sweep clean the earth]. 我愿意是急流及通俗合唱曲十首 : 梁荣平音乐作品集 [Like a rapid stream and ten light choral works] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING 782.5 LRP (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on a poem by 杜红 about spring cleaning. Performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir and Echo Philharmonic Choir with So Heng (苏恒) on piano.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1999). When will the flowers bloom. Asian a cappella: The new spirit of Asian folksongs [CD]. Singapore: The Philharmonic Chorus.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Recorded at the Hollywood Recording Studio, Singapore from 28 April to 1 May 1999. Performed by The Philharmonic Chamber Choir Singapore conducted by Lim Yau.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (2000). Azure sky. On Asian choral works 1 [CD]. Singapore: Singapore Youth Choir.
    Call no.: RSING 782.542 SIN (Also available on MusicSG)
    This song 《碧云天》 was recorded in concert in March 1999, Victoria Concert Hall, Singapore.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (2000). Nightmare. On Asian choral works 1 [CD]. Singapore: Singapore Youth Choir.
    Call no.: RSING 782.542 SIN (Also available on MusicSG)
    Recorded in Jan – Mar 2000 at Victoria Concert Hall, Singapore, with Shane Thio on piano.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007).  春天的歌: 歌声的海洋 [Spring songs at the ocean] [CD]. Singapore: Metro Philharmonic Society.
    Call no.: RSING/RAV 782.5 LRP
    A collection of songs arranged by Leong and performed by the Metro Philharmonic Choir. Songs include 《春之歌》, 《春风的耳语》, 《恭喜大家今年好》, 《海岛之春》, 《新对花》, 《恭喜发财》, 《新年歌儿大家唱》, 《哩哩哩》, 《迎春花》, 《欢迎你们远方的朋友》, 《启程远航》, 《告别海港》, 《上茶山》, 《紫竹调》, 《种稻》 and 《假日营组歌》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007).  Holiday camp song cycle = 假日营组歌 [wav]. Retrieved from NORA.
    In seven movements, this is an extended song cycle written early in Leong’s career (1969). The writing here is mostly tonal, with conventional harmonic progressions. Throughout Holiday Camp, Leong gives the pianist a more active involvement in the initiating of rhythms, melodies, and in mood setting. Though the piano writing can be awkward, there is a greater sense of purpose when tasked to provide counter melodies or rhythmic and melodic opposition to the voices.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007). Nine cantos = 九歌 [wav]. Retrieved from NORA.
    This is one of Leong’s more substantial choral work composed in 1986. Based on the work of poet patriot Qu Yuan who lived during the time of China’s Warring States Period, Nine Cantos is in eleven sections and is programmatic in nature. Set in the beautiful province of Hunan, the narrative elements in this poem allow for greater interplay between the voices and the supporting instruments, the piano and percussion. The varied timbre of the percussion instruments (glockenspiel, tambourine, temple bells, timpani, Chinese drum, etc.) provides Leong with the opportunity to characterize each section with a distinctive timbre. There is also greater independence of parts between the piano and percussion. Though the piano assumes a variety of styles across different movements, it is mostly cast in a supportive role, reinforcing choral parts, or sometimes offering momentum to relatively static vocal parts. The eleven sections: Monarch of the East 《东皇太一》, Lord of the Clouds 《云中君》, Lord and Lady of Xiang (1) 《湘君/湘夫人(上)》, Lord and Lady of Xiang (2) 《湘君/湘夫人(下)》, Master of Fate 《大司命》, Young Master of Fate (少司命), Lord of the East 《东君》, River Deity 《河伯》, Mountain Goddess 《山鬼》, Hymn of the Fallen Warriors 《国薚》 and Ritual Finale 《礼魂》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007).  The peacock’s east-southerly flight: secular cantata for voice and piano = 孔雀東南飛 [wav]. Retrieved from NORA.
    Written in 1962, The text tells the story of ill-fated lovers destined to be together only in death. The vocal writing in The Peacock’s East-Southerly Flight is patriotic in style, with many recognizable pentatonic turns of phrase. Leong maintains that this is the influence of Teochew street operas or wayangs he witnessed in his youth.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007).  Story of Mulan = 木兰诗 [wav]. Retrieved from NORA.
    Leong’s first composition in 1953, this may be perceived as Leong’s musical representation of Mulan’s defiance of social norms and her war against the invaders.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2009).  Leong Yoon Pin : a choral odyssey [CD]. Singapore: Zechariah Music.
    Call no.: RSING 784.5 LIA
    A collection of songs sung by various school choirs, recorded on 25th August 2009 at the Esplanade Concert Hall. Songs include Song Cycle: Mountain Flute, Street Calls, Sunset, Love Quatrains, Frog in the Rain, Four Poems of Tu Mu, Here Comes the Bride, River Qing Jian, Three Sisters, When Will the Flowers Blossom, Nightmare and Nostalgia.

 

Sound Recordings: Orchestral Works

(in chronological order)

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Episodes in Journey to the West. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    Composed in 1983, this music was created as part of Leong’s reflection on certain interesting episodes from the famous Chinese novel Journey to the West (《西游记》). It is in three continuous movements.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Giocoso: Largamente. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    The third movement of Leong’s Second Symphony, which was completed in 1979 and premiered in the same year by the Metro Philharmonic Society’s chorus and orchestra. It is based on the poetic sentiments of the poet Li Bai.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Largo: Vivace. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    Composed in 1982, Largo is in 2 distinct sections of which Vivace‘s basic rhythm is taken from a Fujian folk song.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Metamorphosis. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    Metamorphosis was composed in 1993 as a special commission for the Singapore Youth Orchestra for the 1993 Kumamoto Festival in Japan.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Overture “Dayong Sampan”. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    Based on the Malay folk song Dayong Sampan, this 1980 work was the first Singaporean composition performed by the Singapore Symphony Orchestra.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Choo Hoey. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1993). Temasekian. Symphonic works of Singapore [CD]. Singapore: National Arts Council.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 LEO (Also available on MusicSG)
    Composed in 1990, the Temasekian is a symphonic tribute to Singapore’s pioneering forefathers who sailed the high seas to arrive in the tropical lands of Malaya.
    Performed by Singapore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced as a documentation project of the National Arts Council.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1995). Jubilation. Singapore Youth Orchestra [CD]. Singapore: Singapore Youth Orchestra.
    Call no.: RSING 784.2 SIN
    Written for piano, harp, percussion and strings, Jubilation (A Little Entertainment) takes on a jovial mood, like a gift to friends on a happy occasion. Performed by Singapore Youth Orchestra, conducted by Lim Yau. The album was produced by the Singapore Youth Orchestra under the auspices of the Ministry of Education.

 

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.] (2007).  Concerto for harmonica = 口琴協奏曲 [wav]. Retrieved from NORA.
    This piece was first performed in 1980 by 马少良 (Ma Shaoliang). Written for the harmonica with piano accompaniment, the music is in 3 parts.

 

Music Scores

(in chronological order)

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1961). 青年歌声 [Voice of youth]. 新加坡 : 青年书局.
    Call no.: RUR Chinese 782.42095957 LRP

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1968). 友情之歌 [Song of friendship]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1969). 假日营组歌 [Song cycle ‘holiday camp’]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RCLOS Chinese 782.470264 LRP
    Lyrics by 丁立, 李映青 and 韩永元. This piece talks about a group of youths having fun together at holiday camp, reflecting the passion of youth.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1972). 通俗合唱曲三首 [Three Light Choral Pieces]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Score to the songs 《当我们欢唱在一起》 (Joyous Singing), 《微弱》 (Counting the Stars) and 《早安啊, 大地》(Good Morning Mother Earth). Lyrics written by 辛白 (Xing Bai).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1979). 李白诗四首 [Four Poems of Li Bai]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1981). 清江河 [River Qing Jiang]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    Based on a Hubei folk song about the River Qingjiang.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1981). 三个妹儿三 [Three sisters]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    Based on a Hubei folk song.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1982). Largo: for string orchestra. Singapore: [s.n.].
    Call no.: RU 784.7026 LEO -[ART]

    Composed in 1982, Largo is in 2 distinct sections of which Vivace‘s basic rhythm is taken from a Fujian folk song.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1983). 槐花几时开 [When will the flower blossom]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    Based on a Sichuan folk song about a girl’s longing for her love.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1986). Aspiration. In 5 choral pieces from Singapore: commissioned works. Singapore: Ministry of Community Development.
    Call no.: RCLOS 782.5 FIV
    Published in conjunction with the 6th Festival of Choirs ’86, this song was commissioned for the festival. It is based on a poem by 程文恺 about nature and giving.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1986). For a thousand miles. In 5 choral pieces from Singapore: commissioned works. Singapore: Ministry of Community Development.
    Call no.: RCLOS 782.5 FIV
    Published in conjunction with the 6th Festival of Choirs ’86, this song was commissioned for the festival.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1988). Prelude orientale. Singapore: Ministry of Community Development.
    Call no.: RSING 786.4026 LEO
    This piano score was developed in connection with the Sixth National Music Competition.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]. (1988). 舞龙 [Dragon Dance] Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    This piece uses the human voice to mimic the music used for dragon dances with “qiang”, “dong”, “tectoc” and trills.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]. (1990). Lenggang. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    This piece is based on a Malay folk rhyme.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1990). Strands: For chamber orchestra. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Strands is a non-programmatic piece based entirely on structural juxtaposition of various musical elements in 3 sections: Andante, Adagio and Allegro vivace.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1990). Temasekian: symphonic poem. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This music is inspired by memories of junk boats sailing in the high seas in the deep of the night and the yearning for sighting land after months of ocean journey. It attempts to express moments of uncertainty, loneliness and depression contrasted with excitement in a new environment. It is a symphonic tribute to Singapore’s pioneering forefathers who sailed the high seas to arrive in the tropical lands of Malaya.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1993). 爱情四行诗 [Love quatrains: A trilingual unaccompanied chorus]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This was a test piece written for all participating groups in 1993’s Choral Festival.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1996). Blessing the seas: Concert overture. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Conductor’s score to Blessing the Seas. This was a specially commissioned work dedicated to then President Ong Teng Cheong that premiered at the National University of Singapore Symphony Orchestra’s annual concert in 1996.

 

  • Leong, Y. P. (1996). 孔雀東南飛 [The peacock’s east-southerly flight]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.25 LYP
    Based on the Han Dynasty folk song of the same name, The story tells of ill-fated lovers destined to be together only in death. This was first written for three parts in 1962, but later rewritten in 1993 for four parts to achieve a fuller texture more suitable for the performance venue.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1997). 街头巷尾 [Street calls]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    With text written in the Cantonese dialect, this piece simulates street calls by food hawkers. The entire song is made up of food names in Cantonese, like “geui-chuk” (chicken porridge), “wen-ten-min” (wanton noodles) and “ha-gao” (prawn dumpling). This piece was commissioned for the 1997 Singapore Youth Festival Choral Competition.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1997). 花的组歌 [Three choruses of flowers]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.5062 LYP
    This piece is sung in 3 parts: 《采花调》 (Allegro con Spirito), 《高高山上一枝花》 (Andantino Broadly) and 《四朵鲜花》 (Allegretto).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1997). 我愿意是急流 [Like a rapid stream]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LYP
    Based on a poem by Hungarian poet Sandor Petof (1823-1849) and translated by Sun Yong (孙用), this poem was set to music for an 8-part double chorus by Leong Yoon Pin in 1981 at the invitation of Lim Yau.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1997). 碧云天 [Azure sky]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This piece was inspired by the English translation of a poem by Song dynasty writer, Fan Zhongyan (范仲淹).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1998). 烟雾: for a cappella SSATTB chorus. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Commissioned by the Singapore Youth Choir, this piece was inspired by the haze in 1997 and performed in 1998.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1999). 新娘来啦 [Here comes the bride]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    A joyous piece about the arrival of the bride.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (1999). 叫卖人和女高音 [Pedlars and the soprano]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This piece, written with Malay words, was commissioned by the NUS Centre for the Arts. It provides a scenario of the interplay between a soprano and street pedlars that culminates in a united chorus of “Nasi Lemak”.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2000). 口琴协奏曲 [Concerto for harmonica]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RCLOS Chinese 788.82186 LRP
    A score for harmonica with piano, this piece was first performed in 1980 by 马少良 (Ma Shaoliang).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2000). 思念 [Nostalgia]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This song was especially meaningful to Leong as it talks about how a Singaporean longs to come home to this beautiful land, reminiscent of the homesickness he felt when he was in London and Paris. Lyrics by 刘文注 (Liu Wenzhu), commissioned by the Singapore Youth Choir.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2004). 春天的歌: 无伴奏合唱曲 [Spring songs: a cappella arrangements]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.5 LRP
    The first collection of a cappella songs arranged by Leong on the theme of spring. Includes songs 《哩哩哩》, 《歌迎春》, 《春夜洛城闻笛》, 《丰年》, 《迎春花》, 《春之歌》, 《春花齐放》, 《春天里的鲜花怒放》, 《恭喜恭喜》 and 《新年歌儿大家唱》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2004). 春天的歌: 第二集: 无伴奏合唱曲 [Spring songs: 2nd collection: a cappella arrangement]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.5 LRP
    A collection of a cappella songs arranged by Leong on the theme of spring. Includes songs 《新对花》, 《春景》, 《春风吻上我的脸》, 《贺新年》, 《恭喜发财》, 《大拜年》and 《春之晨》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2004). 木兰诗 [Story of Mulan]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RCLOS Chinese 782.430264 LRP
    The vocal score inspired by heroine 花木兰 (Hua Mulan), reflecting her thoughts and feelings as she takes the place of her father to go to war. This was Leong’s first choral work written in 1953.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2004). Sunset. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    With text adapted from William Blake’s “Night”, this piece 《日落》 talks about multi-racial workers being attracted to Malay folks dancing in the kampong on their way home after work, while Indian musicians play fascinating ethnic instruments in their community hall, eventually drawing them in to join in with a sunset chorale. A set piece for Singapore Youth Festival 2005 commissioned by the Co-Curricular Activities Branch of the Ministry of Education.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2005). 春天的歌: 第三集 [Spring songs: 3rd collection]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LRP
    A collection of choral songs arranged by Leong on the theme of spring. Includes songs 《春之歌》, 《春风的耳语》, 《恭喜大家今年好》, 《海岛之春》, 《春天的降临》, 《春天的花朵》and 《春之舞曲》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2005). 山笛组歌 [Mountain flute song cycle]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.47 LRP
    Lyrics by 古笛 (Gu Di), music by Leong. The song cycle comprise of 6 parts: 《可爱的山乡》, 《蕉林曲》, 《芦笛岩》, 《唱起山歌过岭游》, 《船从远方来》 and 《漓江月》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2005). 相爱到白头: 无伴奏合唱曲 [Forever loving: a cappella arrangements]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LRP
    A romantic piece about a young couple in love with promises to love each other forever.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2006). 关不住的春光 : 混声四部合唱曲 [Spring scenes surging : S.A.T.B. four-part chorus]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.50264 LRP
    Leong wrote the piano part for this piece, where the melody and voice parts were written by 王云阶 (Wang Yunjie) and text by 欧阳予倩 (Ouyang Yuqian).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2006). 七首二部合唱曲 [Seven two-part Asian choruses]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2006). 七首三部南海合唱曲 [Seven three-part choruses from the Southern Seas]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2007). 春天的歌: 第四集 [Spring songs: 4th collection]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: RSING Chinese 782.420264 LRP
    A collection of choral songs arranged by Leong with piano accompaniment on the theme of spring. Includes songs 《迎春曲》, 《歌唱新春》, 《桃花开在春风里》, 《春天来到了》, 《故乡》, 《怀春曲》, 《春花如锦》 and 《春》.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2008). 大海颂 [Ode to the Sea]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Composed under the name 永斌 (Yongbin); lyrics by 许建吾 (Xu Jianwu).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2008). 怀颂屈原 [Remembering Qu Yuan]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    An ode to the famous poet 屈原 (Qu Yuan). Lyrics by 谢于对 (Xie Yudui).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2008). 梁荣平独唱曲集 [Leong Yoon Pin songs for solo voices]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    The vocal score to Leong Yoon Pin’s songs written for solo voices. Songs are in Chinese.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2008). 晚会回旋曲 [Rondo in G]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2008). 为了和平与友谊 [For peace and friendship]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Composed under the name 永斌 (Yongbin); lyrics by 钟灵 (Zhong Ling). A song about freedom and peace.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2011). 创造 [Creation]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This is a piano and chorus arrangement done by Leong of the song 《创造》from the 1946 film 《鶯飛人間》, originally composed by 林枚 (Lin Mei) and 克纯 (Ke Chun).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2016). 欢迎你们远方的朋友 [Welcome, friends from afar]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2016). 抒情歌三首 [Three poems of Tagore]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    A choral work based on the translated text by well-known Chinese author 冰心 (Bing Xin) of Rabindranath Tagore’s works.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (2016). 夜歌 [Night song]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 当百花盛开 [When the flowers bloom]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 舒金 (Shu Jin).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 建设新加坡 [Build up my Singapore]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    A song about the hopes and aspirations of post-independent Singapore.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 莫彷徨 [Do not hesitate]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 青山.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 你该来了 [Time for you to come]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 力匡 (Li Kuang).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 千百万人踏过的路上 [The path trodden by 10 million people]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Vocal arrangement arranged by Leong for Metro Philharmonic Choir.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 情献 [Dedication]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 陈善文 (Chen Shanwen).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 十四行诗 [Sonnet]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 冯至 (Feng Zhi).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 喜迎春 [Welcome spring]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 艾化 (Ai Hua).

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 一把芝麻的23变奏 [23 settings of yibazhima]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    This piece uses the five notes of the ancient Chinese five-tone scale to encompass the feelings of dignity, simplicity, joy, mystery, liveliness and banter.

 

  • 梁荣平. [Liang, R. P.]  (n.d.). 朝阳 [The rising sun]. Singapore: Pro Musica Enterprise.
    Call no.: PublicationSG
    Lyrics by 沈焕瑜 (Shen Huanyu).

 

Websites

The following websites contain useful information on this topic.

  • National Academy of Fine Arts Library (2012). Special collections: Celebrity collection. Retrieved July 12, 2017, from the NAFA Library website: http://library.nafa.edu.sg/collections/special-collections
    A short write-up of the Leong Yoon Pin collection at the National Academy of Fine Arts, that was donated in 2012.

 

  • National Library Board (2011). Leong Yoon Pin written by Eleanor A. L. Tan. Retrieved July 12, 2017, from Singapore Infopedia.
    A biography of Leong Yoon Pin that talks about his life and education, musical achievements, his role as an educator, awards and a chronological listing of some of his works.

 

  • National Library Board (2011). Cultural Medallion Recipient: Leong Yoon Pin. Retrieved July 12, 2017 from National Online Repository of the Arts (NORA).
    This site provides a selection of key works digitised as part of NLB’s NORA project. There is also an interview with Leong produced as part of the documentation project.

 

  • National University of Singapore (2016). Singaporean composers collection: Leong Yoon Pin. Retrieved from the NUS Libraries website: http://libguides.nus.edu.sg/sgcomposers
    This site provides a sampling of resources on Leong Yoon Pin that are available at the National University of Singapore Libraries.

 

Other Resources

  • Leong, Y. P. (2000-2011). Notes, and drafts by Leong Yoon Pin on composing. [typescript].
    Call no.: RCLOS 780.92 LEO
    A collection of donated notes and drafts by Leong, comprising of choral works, his work inspiration, notes on talk to Dunman music students on 3rd May 2002 and draft notes for a seminar for secondary music teachers talk on “Composing music with local folk elements”.

 

  • The Performing Right Society (1987). New music forum: A concert featuring works of Singapore composers [Programme]. Singapore: Author.
    Call no.: RSING 780.15 NEW
    This is the programme booklet for the “New Music Forum” concert held on 14 November 1987 at the Victoria Concert Hall, conducted by Lim Yau. Leong was one of the composers featured together with Bernard Tan and Phoon Yew Tien. The programme includes a short biography on Leong, and programme notes for Sketches (for oboe and piano) and Strands, two works by Leong. that was performed. The booklet also includes an extract of the paper “Development of New Music in Singapore” that was presented by Dr. Bernard Tan at the Asian Composers Conference in December 1983.

 

Accessing National Library Board Singapore Resources


Accessing the Print Materials

You can search the library catalogue (for physical materials) in the library and from home (http://catalogue.nlb.gov.sg). The easy search function allows you to search/browse by author, title, keyword, subject and ISBN/ISSN whereas the advanced search allows you to narrow your searches to specific media types or language holdings. In both instances, you will also be able to limit your search to search only specific libraries by clicking on the “limit by branch” option.

To search Lee Kong Chian Reference Library’s Holdings

If you wish to search for only materials available in the Lee Kong Chian Reference Library, please always click on the “Limit by Branch” button at the bottom of the page, after you have keyed in your search term. This brings you to a new page whereby you will be able to select the library of your choice. Choose “Lee Kong Chian Reference Library” and select “yes” under the “Display only items available in the selected branch below” and then click on search.

Things to note:

Once you have identified the title that you need, please double check through the following information and write down the necessary info:

i. The “Status” of the item: the item is not available in the library, if the status displayed is “in transit”, “in process” or “not ready for loan”.

ii. Double check that the item is in Lee Kong Chian Reference Library under “Branch”.

iii. Write down the Location Code and the Call Number of the item. This helps you to locate the item within Lee Kong Chian Reference Library. Please refer to the table below for more information (Note: Please feel free to approach the counter staff for help in locating the books.)

All featured books and periodicals are located at the Lee Kong Chian Reference Library unless otherwise indicated.

Accessing the Databases

The National Library Board (NLB)’s eResources are free for all NLB members. Click here to find out how to register as a member.

If you’re having problems registering or logging in, please contact us. If you wish to find information in the databases but am not sure where to begin, or need recommendations on which databases to use, please use the “Ask A Librarian” function or send an email to ref@nlb.gov.sg for help. The librarian will get back to you within three working days.

 

Author

Dr. Eleanor A. L. Tan
Kong Leng Foong (Updated by)

 

The information in this resource guide is valid as at July 2017 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history on the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

All Rights Reserved. National Library Board Singapore 2017

Written by Kong Leng Foong