100 General Reference eBooks on Overdrive

Introduction

This resource guide features 100 digital reference titles specially selected from the NLB OverDrive* platform. The titles fall into three broad subject categories:

  • Business
  • Science and Technology
  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Covering key topics such as business management, sustainability, energy sources, culture and social media, these 100 ebooks are a convenient way to access reference titles for the purpose of research or simply to gain a deeper understanding of current topics.

*The individual book descriptions used below are extracted with permission from OverDrive.

 

Business

(listed in alphabetical order)

The ebooks found in the Business collection covers concepts such as business management, entrepreneurship, marketing and public relations, business sustainability and teamwork.

 

 

  • Burt, T. (2015). 2020 vision: Today’s business leaders on tomorrow’s world. London: Elliot & Thompson.
    2020 Vision delivers cutting-edge insights from twenty industry leaders such as chairmen and senior executives of major multinationals, sharing their visions of what their markets, companies and strategies will look like in 2020, and how they will prepare for and adapt to long-term change in the face of new technology, globalisation, intense competition, decreasing security and maturing markets.

 

 

 

 

  • Cross, S. (2016). First and fast: Outpace your competitors, lead your markets, and accelerate growth. New York: Business Expert Press.
    First and Fast provides business leaders with a comprehensive and pragmatic set of tools and ideas to enable them to grow their businesses by increasing pace, building momentum, and accelerating growth in a systematic way without creating confusion, frustration, and unnecessary risk.

 

  • Dale, B. G., Bamford, D. & van der Wiele, T. (2016). Managing quality: An essential guide and resource gateway (6th ed) . West Sussex, U.K. : John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    This updated edition of Managing Quality combines information on quality management system series standards with up-to-date tools, techniques and quality systems, and includes insights on quality, operations management, and strategic process improvement.

 

  • Danner, J. & Coopersmith, M. (2015). The other “F” word: How smart leaders, teams, and entrepreneurs put failure to work. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    The Other “F” Word shows how successful leaders and teams are putting failure to work every day – to re-engage employees, spark innovation and accelerate growth. It features a practical seven-stage framework to liberate failure as a force to advance leadership agendas.

 

 

  • Fiksel, J. (2015). Resilient by design: Creating businesses that adapt and flourish in a changing world. Washington, D. C.: Island Press.
    Resilient by Design provides business executives with a comprehensive approach to achieving consistent success in a changing world. Providing examples and case studies of organisations that are designing resilience into their business processes, it explains how to connect with important external systems and create innovative, dynamic organisations that survive and prosper under any circumstances.

 

 

  • Gans, J. (2017). The disruption dilemma. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    The Disruption Dilemma focuses on the phenomenon of disruption in business, looking at companies that have proven to be resilient and those that have fallen, and explaining why some companies have successfully managed disruption. It also looks at a range of actions which business leaders can take to deal with various types of disruption mentioned in the book.

 

  • Gleeson, D. (2016). Stairway to profits: 150 business strategies, concepts and ideas. Fremantle: Vivid Publishing.
    Stairway to Profits details 150 strategies, concepts and ideas that, if implemented, will give business owners a more profitable, valuable, and enjoyable business. These strategies apply irrespective of the type of business, the size of the business, or even the level of business experience of the owner.

 

 

  • Grant, A. & Grant, G. (2016). The innovation race: How to change a culture to change the game. Milton, Qld.: John Wiley and Sons Australia, Ltd.
    The Innovation Race explores the current state of innovation and outlines some challenges which can impact innovation. It also provides concrete strategies and tools to support purpose-driven sustainable innovation through deep cultural transformation for long term success.

 

  • Hanman, S. & George, I. (2015). From me to we: Design and build collaborative workplaces. Victoria: Collaborative Enquiry.
    From Me to We provides insights into the way in which economic and social relationships can be transformed in the building industry to benefit companies and staff by building a culture of collaboration in organisations.

 

  • Heagney, J. (2016). Fundamentals of project management. New York: Amacom Books.
    The updated version of Fundamentals of Project Management looks at various aspects of project management, including developing project goals and objectives, creating project risk plans and realistic schedules, and leading a project team.

 

  • Howard, B. (2015). We-commerce: How to create, collaborate, and succeed in the sharing economy. New York: Penguin Publishing Group.
    We-commerce provides readers with a reinvented business toolkit that they can use to effectively collaborate, co-create, and succeed in a We-Commerce landscape, and to acquire a new set of skills that will position them as leaders in the transformed economy.

 

  • Jose, P.D. (2016). Corporations and sustainability: The South Asian perspective. Sheffield, United Kingdom: Greenleaf Publishing.
    Corporations and Sustainability: The South Asian Perspective is a collection of contributions from leading academics and practitioners which provides an overview of the key challenges and solutions related to business sustainability in the South Asian region.

 

  • Marr, B. (2016). Big data in practice: How 45 successful companies used big data analytics to deliver extraordinary results. West Sussex, U.K.: John Wiley and Sons Ltd.
    Big Data in Practice looks at how major companies use big data every day from an on-the-ground perspective to learn about customers, improve manufacturing, spur innovation and improve safety. For each company profiled, learn what data was used, what problem it solved and the practical processes put in place, as well as the technical details, challenges and lessons learned from each unique scenario.

 

  • Maxwell, J. C. (2017). No limits: Blow the cap off your capacity. New York: Center Street.
    No Limits identifies and examines 17 core capacities and provides clear and actionable advice on how they can help to increase potential. Some of these abilities are those which we all already possess, such as energy, creativity and leadership, while others are aspects of our lives controlled by our choices, like our attitudes, character, and intentionality.

 

  • McDonald, K. C. (2015). Flat world navigation: Collaboration and networking in the global digital economy. London: Kogan Page.
    Flat World Navigation introduces the new future of work in the ‘flattened world’ of the new digital attention-based economy via exclusive insights and advice on flat world navigation, and interviews with international business leaders who successfully use flat world navigation skills.

 

  • Miner, J. & Ball-Stahl, K. (2016). Models of proposal planning & writing. Santa Barbara: Greenwood.
    This ebook is a useful guide for those who are looking for funding in the grant-seeking world. It explains how and why to approach both public and private sponsors with information and persuasion for the best chance for success and provides comprehensive analyses of the key features that made successful proposals persuasive.

 

 

  • Nordgern, C. (2016). Becoming a creative genius {again}. Durham: Torchflame Books.
    Becoming a Creative Genius {again} makes the case that people are all born creative and entrepreneurial geniuses, and explains how everyone can become the most creatively entrepreneurial version of themselves. It also provides numerous lessons and exercises to help people rediscover and rekindle their creativity and entrepreneurial spirit.

 

  • Parmenter, D. (2015). Key performance indicators: Developing, implementing, and using winning KPIs (3rd ed). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Key Performance Indicators provides an in-depth look at how KPIs can be most effectively used to assess and drive organisational performance via a model useful for simplifying KPIs and avoiding the pitfalls ready to trap the unprepared organisation. It also includes a variety of templates, checklists, and performance measures to help streamline processes in a company.

 

  • Rezaee, Z. (2015). Business sustainability: Performance, compliance, accountability and integrated reporting. Sheffield, United Kingdom: Greenleaf Publishing.
    This ebook looks at the topic of business sustainability, providing insights into emerging initiatives in corporate reporting, including the major reporting standards and the convergence to a set of global accounting standards. It also identifies some sustainability strategies useful in creating innovation in new products, services, energy-efficiency, environmental facilities and green initiatives.

 

  • Smith, S. & Milligan, A. (2015). On purpose: Delivering a branded customer experience people love. London: Kogan Page.
    On Purpose is a practical guide to executing business purpose successfully by delivering a branded customer experience people love. It provides the tools for brands to stand out by defining, designing and delivering distinctive, valuable customer experiences across multiple channels.

 

  • Wallace, E. (2016). The relationship engine: Connecting with the people who power your business. New York: Amacom Books.
    The Relationship Engine is an insightful and practical guide which provides the tools needed for one to become an intentional and masterful relationship-builder. The book helps one to establish common ground, focus on collaboration instead of command, put people before process, demonstrate worthy intent, and make every interaction matter.

 

  • Williams, E. F. (2015). Green giants: How smart companies turn sustainability into billion-dollar businesses. New York: Amacom Books.
    Green Giants examines nine companies that are merging social responsibility with profitability, revealing six factors responsible for their success while implementing sustainable principles that help consumers live better lives. The companies mentioned in the book range from start-ups to major multinational corporations.

 

  • Worton, H. (2016). Business visibility: How to transform your business mindset & increase your visibility. London: Tribal Publishing.
    Business Visibility is a short introduction on how businesses can become more visible, both online and offline, so that potential customers can easily discover them. It also looks at visibility blocks and how they can be identified and acted upon to make changes in business owners’ mindsets and grow their businesses.

 

Science and Technology

(listed in alphabetical order)

The ebooks found in the Science and Technology collection looks at topics such as renewable and non-renewable sources of energy, climate change, sustainability, conservation and dementia.

 

  • Breeze, P. (2016). Nuclear power. London: Academic Press.
    Nuclear Power is a concise guide to the nuclear power generation. It provides a comprehensive description of the various methods for generating nuclear power and evaluates the political, strategic, environmental, economic, and emotional factors involved in each method, including dangers and risks illustrated in real-life accidents.

 

  • Brinkmann, R. (2016). Introduction to sustainability. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Introduction to Sustainability is an interdisciplinary textbook which examines the development of the field of sustainability and the issues and themes related to environmental, social and economic sustainability.

 

  • Burch, S. & Harris, S. (2016). Understanding climate change: Science, policy, and practice. Ontario: University of Toronto Press.
    Understanding Climate Change provides readers with a concise, accessible, and holistic picture of the climate change problem, including both the scientific and human dimensions.

 

  • Crocker, R. (2016). Somebody else’s problem: Consumerism, sustainability and design. Sheffield, United Kingdom: Greenleaf Publishing.
    Somebody Else’s Problem calls for a radical change in how people design, make and use the products and services. It examines the systems people take for granted in daily life, and their cumulative role in the environmental crisis.

 

 

 

  • Goodall, C. (2016). The switch: How solar, storage and new tech means cheap power for all. London: Profile Books.
    The Switch tracks the transition away from coal, oil and gas to a world in which solar energy can provide much of the energy needed by 10 billion people on this planet. It examines both the solar future and how to get there, and the ways in which solar power can be stored for use.

 

  • Hale, B. (2016). The wild and the wicked: On nature and human nature. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    In The Wild and the Wicked, the author weaves anecdotes with philosophy and argues that nature can be bad much of the time, as seen in natural disasters and diseases, thus the need for people to be environmentally conscientious.

 

  • Heinberg, R. (2015). Afterburn: Society beyond fossil fuels. British Columbia: New Society Publishers.
    Afterburn looks at the shift from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy via fifteen essays that explore various aspects of this twenty-first century migration, including short term political and economic factors which might impede adaptation and potential opportunities and conflicts which the issue might bring.

 

  • Heinberg, R. & Fridley, D. (2016). Our renewable future: Laying the path for one hundred percent clean energy. Washington, D. C.: Island Press.
    Our Renewable Future explores the challenges and opportunities presented by the shift to renewable energy. It begins with a comprehensive overview of our current energy system, then surveys issues of energy supply and demand in key sectors of the economy and the most crucial challenges of using renewable energy.

 

  • Jenkins, C., Ginesi, L. & Keenan, B. (2015). Dementia care at a glance. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Dementia Care at a Glance is a guide on dementia for healthcare professionals, nurses, students and family members who require information and guidance about dementia care. Each chapter outlines an aspect of the experience of living with dementia and the steps that care-givers can take to support them.

 

 

  • Lipsig-Mummé, C. and McBride, S. (Eds.). (2016). Work in a warming world. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.
    Work in a Warming World looks at how the world of work and the labour movement need to become involved in the struggle to slow global warming. Besides this, it also presents ways of creating an effective response to global warming and key building blocks toward a national climate strategy.

 

  • Lockwood, A. H. (2016). Heat advisory: Protecting health on a warming planet. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Heat Advisory describes the impacts which global warming can have on human health. It details the symptoms of climate change and some of the medical side effects which might arise due to this change, such as diseases and under-nutrition.

 

  • McDonald, R. I. (2015). Conservation for cities: How to plan & build natural infrastructure. Washington, D. C.: Island Press.
    Conservation for Cities offers a comprehensive framework for maintaining and strengthening the supporting bonds between cities and nature through innovative infrastructure projects. It first presents a broad approach to incorporating natural infrastructure priorities into urban planning, then focuses on specific ecosystem services in each of its chapters.

 

  • Pilkey, O. H., Pilkey-Jarvis, L. & Pilkey, K. C. (2016). Retreat from a rising sea: Hard choices in an age of climate change. New York: Columbia University Press.
    Retreat from a Rising Sea explains the impacts which climate change and rising oceans will have on coastal communities, and the drastic actions needed to protect the vulnerable populations from those impacts. It also looks at some effective approaches for addressing climate-change denialism.

 

  • Smil, V. (2015). Natural gas: A primer for the 21st century. West Sussex, U.K.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Natural Gas discusses the place and prospects of natural gas in modern high-energy societies. It presents a systematic survey of the qualities, origins, extraction, processing and transportation of natural gas, followed by an analysis of its, and the recent emergence of the fuel as a globally traded commodity.

 

  • Sørensen, B. (2016). Energy, resources and welfare: Exploration of social frameworks for sustainable development. London: Academic Press.
    Energy, Resources and Welfare explores the current hurdles to the universal adoption of renewable energy sources, and proposes solutions to the current situation. It also discusses the social, political and economic issues that make sustainability seem attainable, and explores ways through which change can be achieved without loss of welfare.

 

  • The Worldwatch Institute. (2016). State of the world: Can a city be sustainable? Washington, D.C.: Island Press.
    Can a City be Sustainable examines the core principles of sustainable urbanism and profiles cities that are putting such principles into practice. It looks at the basic structural elements of every city, such as materials, fuel, people and biodiversity, and offers insights on sustainable urbanism via the sharing of first-hand experiences of professionals in urban sustainability projects.

 

Social Science and Humanities

(listed in alphabetical order)

 

The ebooks in the Social Science and Humanities collection cover a wide variety of topics, ranging from urbanisation, Internet security, social media and terrorism to gender issues, humanitarianism and politics.

 

  • Abbott, C. (2016). Imagining urban futures: Cities in science fiction and what we might learn from them. Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press.
    Carl Abbott, who has taught urban studies and urban planning in the last five decades, brings together urban studies and literary studies to examine how fictional cities in work by authors as different as E. M. Forster, Isaac Asimov, Kim Stanley Robinson, and China Miéville might help us to envision an urban future that is viable and resilient. Imagining Urban Futures is a remarkable treatise on what is best and strongest in urban theory and practice today, as refracted and intensely imagined in science fiction.

 

  • Anderson, N. (2013). The Internet police: How crime went online, and the cops followed. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
    In The Internet Police, Ars Technica editor, Nate Anderson, takes readers on a behind-the-screens tour of landmark cybercrime cases, revealing how criminals continue to find digital and legal loopholes even as police hurry to cinch them closed. With each episode in The Internet Police, Anderson shows the dark side of online spaces—but also how dystopian a fully “ordered” alternative would be.

 

  • Armaline, W. T., Glasberg, D. S. & Purkayastha, B. (2015). The human rights enterprise: Political sociology, state power, and social movements. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    This book presents a framework for understanding human rights as a terrain of struggle over power between states, private interests, and organised, “bottom-up” social movements. The authors develop a critical sociology of human rights focusing on the concept of the human rights enterprise: the process through which rights are defined and realised. While states are designated arbiters of human rights according to human rights instruments, they do not exist in a vacuum. Political sociology helps us to understand how global neoliberalism and powerful non-governmental actors (particularly economic actors such as corporations and financial institutions) deeply affect states’ ability and likelihood to enforce human rights standards.

 

  • Castells, M. (2012). Networks of outrage and hope: Social movements in the Internet age. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    Networks of Outrage and Hope is an exploration of the new forms of social movements and protests that are erupting in the world today, from the Arab uprisings to the indignadas movement in Spain, from the Occupy Wall Street movement to the social protests in Turkey, Brazil and elsewhere. In this new edition of his timely and important book, Manuel Castells examines the social, cultural and political roots of these new social movements, studies their innovative forms of self-organisation, assesses the precise role of technology in the dynamics of the movements, suggests the reasons for the support they have found in large segments of society, and probes their capacity to induce political change by influencing people’s minds.

 

  • Chellaney, B. (2015). Water, peace, and war: Confronting the global water crisis. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Now in an updated edition, this pioneering and authoritative study considers the profound impact of the growing global water crunch on international peace and security as well as possible ways to mitigate the crisis. Although water is essential to sustaining life and livelihoods, geostrategist Brahma Chellaney argues that it remains the world’s most underappreciated and undervalued resource.

 

  • Christensen, T. J. (2015). The China challenge. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
    Many see China as a rival superpower to the United States and imagine the country’s rise to be a threat to U.S. leadership in Asia and beyond. Thomas J. Christensen argues against this zero-sum vision. Instead, he describes a new paradigm in which the real challenge lies in dissuading China from regional aggression while encouraging the country to contribute to the global order. Drawing on decades of scholarship and experience as a senior diplomat, Christensen offers a compelling new assessment of U.S.-China relations that is essential reading for anyone interested in the future of the globalised world.

 

 

  • Coker, C. (2015). Future war. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    In this illuminating new book Christopher Coker takes us on an incredible journey into the future of warfare. Focusing on contemporary trends that are changing the nature and dynamics of armed conflict, he shows how conflict will continue to evolve in ways that are unlikely to render our century any less bloody than the last. With insights from philosophy, cutting-edge scientific research and popular culture, Future War is a compelling and thought-provoking meditation on the shape of war to come.

 

  • Cover, R. (2016). Digital identities: Creating and communicating the online self. London: Academic Press.
    Online Identities: Creating and Communicating the Online Self presents a critical investigation of the ways in which representations of identities have shifted since the advent of digital communications technologies. In the era of interactive, digital, and networked media and communication, identity can be understood as even more complex, with digital users arguably playing a more extensive role in fashioning their own self-representations online, as well as making use of the capacity to co-create common and group narratives of identity through interactivity and the proliferation of audio-visual user-generated content online.

 

  • Dhanjani, N. (2015). Abusing the internet of things: Blackouts, freakouts, and stakeouts. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media, Inc.
    This practical book explores how malicious attackers can abuse popular IoT-based devices, including wireless LED lightbulbs, electronic door locks, baby monitors, smart TVs, and connected cars. If you’re part of a team creating applications for Internet-connected devices, this guide will help you explore security solutions. You’ll not only learn how to uncover vulnerabilities in existing IoT devices, but also gain deeper insight into an attacker’s tactics.

 

  • Eggers, W. D. (2016). Delivering on digital: The innovators and technologies that are transforming government. New York: RosettaBooks.
    Imagine prison systems that use digital technology to return nonviolent offenders promptly and securely into society. Imagine a veterans health care system built around delivering a personalised customer experience. We now have the digital tools (cloud computing, mobile devices, analytics) and the talent to stage a real transformation. This book provides the handbook to make it happen. William Eggers, author of eight books and a leading authority on government reform, knows how we can use tech-savvy teams, strong leadership, and innovative practices to reduce the risks and truly achieve a digitally transformed government.

 

  • Ferguson, C. J. (2015). Media psychology 101. New York: Springer Publishing Company.
    Written by one of the foremost experts on the topic, this is a concise overview of what is known and not known about how individuals are affected by and interact with various forms of mass media. The book critically examines research from cognitive, social, developmental, biological, and evolutionary approaches to psychology and addresses the interplay between media consumption and viewer behavior in such realms as advertising, body image and violence.

 

  • Fish, E. (2015). China’s millennials: The want generation. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In 1989, students marched on Tiananmen Square demanding democratic reform. The Communist Party responded with force, but it was jolted into restructuring the economy and overhauling the education of its young citizens. A generation later, Chinese youth are a world apart from those who converged at Tiananmen. Brought up with lofty expectations, they’ve been accustomed to unprecedented opportunities on the back of China’s economic boom. But today, China’s growth is slowing and its demographics rapidly shifting, with the boom years giving way to a painful hangover. Immersed in this transition, Eric Fish, a millennial himself, profiles youth from around the country and how they are navigating the education system, the workplace, divisive social issues, and a resurgence in activism.

 

  • Fisk, N. W. (2016). Framing Internet safety: The governance of youth online. Cambridge: The MIT Press.
    Since the beginning of the Internet era, it has become almost impossible to discuss youth and technology without mentioning online danger — pornography that is just a click away, lurking sexual predators, and inescapable cyberbullies. In this book, Nathan Fisk takes an innovative approach to the subject, examining youth Internet safety as a technology of governance — for information technologies and, by extension, for the forms of sociality and society they make possible. He argues that it is through the mobilisation of various discourses of online risk that the everyday lives of youth are increasingly monitored and policed and the governing potentials of information technologies are explored.

 

  • Gill, R. (2015). Gender and the media. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
    Written in a clear and accessible style, with lots of examples from Anglo-American media, Gender and the Media offers a critical introduction to the study of gender in the media, and an up-to-date assessment of the key issues and debates. The book looks in depth at five areas of media – talk shows, magazines, news, advertising, and contemporary screen and paperback romances – to examine how representations of women and men are changing in the twenty-first century, partly in response to feminist, queer and anti-racist critique.

 

  • Gordon, E. & Mihailidis, P. (2016). Civic media: Technology, design, practice. Cambridge: The MIT Press.
    This book examines the use of “civic media” — the technologies, designs, and practices that support connection through common purpose in civic, political, and social life. Scholars from a range of disciplines and practitioners from a variety of organisations offer analyses and case studies that explore the theory and practice of civic media.

 

  • Gravel, R. (2016). Where we want to live: Reclaiming infrastructure for a new generation of cities. New York: St. Martin’s Press.
    After decades of sprawl, many American city and suburban residents struggle with issues related to traffic (and its accompanying challenges for our health and productivity), divided neighbourhoods, and a non-walkable life. Urban designer Ryan Gravel makes a case for how we can change this. Cities have the capacity to create a healthier, more satisfying way of life by remodelling and augmenting their infrastructure in ways that connect neighbourhoods and communities. Gravel came up with a way to do just that in his hometown with the Atlanta Beltline project. It connects 40 diverse Atlanta neighbourhoods to city schools, shopping districts, and public parks, and has already seen a huge payoff in real estate development and local business revenue.

 

  • Hanson, F. (2015). Internet wars: The struggle for power in the 21st century. Haberfield, New South Wales: Longueville Media.
    Vivid, bold and brisk, Internet Wars traces one of the most critical emerging power struggles of the 21st century, the battle to control the internet. Already exploitation of this super-network has helped create the world’s most valuable company, toppled governments, led to the largest wealth transfer in history, and created the most extensive global surveillance system ever known. Internet Wars is a call to action for a more informed debate about a contest that will profoundly affect us all for generations to come.

 

  • Harrison, R. M. & Herr, T. (2016). Cyber insecurity: Navigating the perils of the next information age. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this volume, academics, practitioners from both private sector and government, along with former service members come together to highlight sixteen of the most pressing contemporary challenges in cybersecurity, and to offer recommendations for the future. As internet connectivity continues to spread, this book will offer readers greater awareness of the threats of tomorrow—and serve to inform public debate into the next information age.

 

  • Hong, Z. (2015). The price of China’s economic development: Power, capital, and the poverty of rights. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky.
    The People’s Republic of China has experienced significant transformations since Deng Xiaoping instituted economic reforms in 1978. Subsequent leaders continued and often broadened Deng’s policies, shifting the nation from agrarianism to industrialism, from isolation to internationalism, and from centralised planning to market-based economics. Zhaohui Hong assesses the sociocultural consequences of these reforms in this provocative study.

 

  • Hurlbut, J. B. (2017). Experiments in democracy: Human embryo research and the politics of bioethics. New York: Columbia University Press.
    Experiments in Democracy presents a history of American debates over human embryo research from the late 1960s to the present, exploring their crucial role in shaping norms, practices, and institutions of deliberation governing the ethical challenges of modern bioscience. J. Benjamin Hurlbut details how scientists, bioethicists, policymakers, and other public figures have attempted to answer a question of great consequence: how should the public reason about aspects of science and technology that effect fundamental dimensions of human life?

 

  • Jenkins, H., Ito, M. & Boyd, D. (2016). Participatory culture in a networked era: A conversation on youth, learning, commerce, and politics. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    In the last two decades, both the conception and the practice of participatory culture have been transformed by the new affordances enabled by digital, networked, and mobile technologies. This exciting new book explores that transformation by bringing together three leading figures in conversation. Jenkins, Ito and Boyd examine the ways in which our personal and professional lives are shaped by experiences interacting with and around emerging media.

 

  • Kelly, W. R. (2016). The future of crime and punishment: Smart policies for reducing crime and saving money. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Today, we have the tools for effective criminal behavioral change, but this cannot be an excuse for criminal offending. In The Future of Crime and Punishment, William R. Kelly identifies the need to educate the public on how these tools can be used to most effectively and cost efficiently reduce crime, recidivism, victimisation and cost. The justice system of the future needs to be much more collaborative, utilising the expertise of a variety of disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry, addiction, and neuroscience.

 

  • Kissell, J. (2015). Take control of your online privacy. British Columbia, Canada: TidBITS Publishing, Inc.
    In the ebook, Joe helps you understand what to expect about online privacy and develop a sensible online privacy strategy, customised for your needs. He then explains how to enhance the privacy of your Internet connection, Web browsing, email messages, online chatting, social media interactions, and file sharing, as well as your mobile phone or tablet, and Internet of Things devices like webcams and thermostats. Plus, parents will find important reminders about protecting a child’s privacy.

 

  • Kuhse, H., Schüklenk, U. & Singer, P. (2015). Bioethics: An anthology (3rd ed.). West Sussex, U.K.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Bioethics: An Anthology, 3rd edition, contains a wealth of new material reflecting the latest developments. This definitive text brings together writings on an unparalleled range of key ethical issues, compellingly presented by internationally renowned scholars. Thematically organised around an unparalleled range of issues, including discussion of the moral status of embryos and fetuses, new genetics, neuroethics, life and death, resource allocation, organ donations, public health, AIDS, human and animal experimentation, genetic screening, and issues facing nurses.

 

  • Law, R. (2016). Terrorism: A history. Cambridge, U.K.: Polity Press.
    In Terrorism: A History, Law reveals how the very definition of the word has changed, how the tactics and strategies of terrorism have evolved, and how those who have used it adapted to revolutions in technology, communications, and political ideologies. Terrorism: A History extensively covers such topics as jihadist violence, state terror, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, Northern Ireland, anarcho-terrorism, and the Ku Klux Klan, plus lesser known movements in Uruguay and Algeria, as well as the pre-modern uses of terror in ancient Rome, medieval Europe, and the French Revolution.

 

  • Leung, J.C.B. & Xu, Y. (2015). China’s social welfare: The third turning point. Cambridge, U.K.: Polity Press.
    This timely book explores key turning points in China’s trajectory, from the creation of a socialist egalitarian society promising a relatively stable livelihood at the expense of economic development, through the market-oriented reforms which have dismantled the traditional social protection system. The authors present the formidable social challenges ahead, including demographic shift, residential migration, and corrosive inequalities, and outline the emerging forms of social security protection in urban and rural areas, community-based social care services, non-governmental organisations and the social work profession.

 

  • Li, S. & Li, D. X. (2017). Securing the Internet of Things. Cambridge, MA: Syngress, an imprint of Elsevier.
    Securing the Internet of Things provides network and cybersecurity researchers and practitioners with both the theoretical and practical knowledge they need to know regarding security in the Internet of Things (IoT). This book explains the fundamental concepts of IoT security, describing practical solutions that account for resource limitations at IoT end-node, hybrid network architecture, communication protocols, and application characteristics. Highlighting the most important potential IoT security risks and threats, the book covers both the general theory and practical implications for people working in security in the Internet of Things.

 

  • Magette, K. (2015). Embracing social media: A practical guide to manage risk and leverage opportunity. Lanham, Maryland, US: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Embracing Social Media: A Practical Guide to Manage Risk and Leverage Opportunity is a practical guide for anyone wishing to facilitate the embrace of social media in a school system. Included are steps for creating policy, procedures, and guidelines, as well as specific strategies to help open the minds of reluctant colleagues and leaders. Also included are best practices for social media, with numerous examples for teaching and learning, professional development, communications with parents, and successfully managing difficult situations online.

 

  • Mahoney, L. M. & Tang, T. (2016). Strategic social media: From marketing to social change. West Sussex, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Strategic Social Media is the first textbook to go beyond the marketing plans and how-to guides, and provide an overview of the theories, action plans, and case studies necessary for teaching students and readers about utilising social media to meet marketing goals. It explores the best marketing practices for reaching business goals, while also providing strategies that students/readers can apply to any past, present or future social media platform.

 

  • Margetts, H., et al. (2015). Political turbulence: How social media shape collective action. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
    Drawing on large-scale data generated from the Internet and real-world events, this book shows how mobilisations that succeed are unpredictable, unstable, and often unsustainable. To better understand this unruly new force in the political world, the authors use experiments that test how social media influence citizens deciding whether or not to participate. They show how different personality types react to these social influences and identify which types of people are willing to participate at an early stage in a mobilisation when there are few supporters or signals of viability. The authors argue that pluralism is the model of democracy that is emerging in the social media age—not the ordered, organised vision of early pluralists, but a chaotic, turbulent form of politics.

 

  • Meyer, C. L., et al. (2017). Explaining suicide: Patterns, motivations, and what notes reveal. London: Academic Press.
    The rate of suicides is at its highest level in nearly 30 years. Suicide notes have long been thought to be valuable resources for understanding suicide motivation, but up to now the small sample sizes available have made an in-depth analysis difficult. Explaining Suicide: Patterns, Motivations, and What Notes Reveal represents a large-scale analysis of suicide motivation across multiple ages during the same time period. This was made possible via a unique dataset of all suicide notes collected by the coroner’s office in southwestern Ohio 2000–2009. Based on an analysis of this dataset, the book identifies top motivations for suicide, how these differ between note writers and non-note writers, and what this can tell us about better suicide prevention.

 

  • Miller, D., Costa, E. & Haynes, N. (2016). How the world changed social media. London: UCL Press.
    How the World Changed Social Media is the first book in Why We Post, a book series that investigates the findings of anthropologists who each spent 15 months living in communities across the world. This book offers a comparative analysis summarising the results of the research and exploring the impact of social media on politics and gender, education and commerce. Supported by an introduction to the project’s academic framework and theoretical terms that help to account for the findings, the book argues that the only way to appreciate and understand something as intimate and ubiquitous as social media is to be immersed in the lives of the people who post.

 

  • Miller, J. F. K. (2016). Trickle-down censorship: An outsider’s account of working inside China’s censorship regime. Victoria, Australia: Hybrid Publishers.
    For six years, from 2005 to 2011, Australian JFK Miller worked in Shanghai for English-language publications censored by state publishers under the aegis of the Chinese Communist Party. In this wry memoir, he offers a view of that regime, as he saw it, as an outsider from the bottom up. Trickle-down censorship explores how censorship affected him, a Westerner who took free speech for granted. It is about how he learned censorship in a system where the rules are kept secret; it is about how he became his own Thought Police through self-censorship; it is about the peculiar relationship he developed with his censors, and the moral choices he made as a result of censorship and how, having made those choices, he viewed others.

 

  • Mitchell, C. (2016). Hacked: The inside story of America’s struggle to secure cyberspace. Lanham; Boulder; New York; London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Hacked, veteran cybersecurity journalist Charles Mitchell reveals the innovative, occasionally brilliant, and too-often hapless government and industry responses to growing cybersecurity threats. He examines the internal power struggles in the federal government, the paralysis on Capitol Hill, and the industry’s desperate effort to stay ahead of both the bad guys and the government.

 

  • Murray, C. (2016). In our hands: A plan to replace the welfare state. Washington: AEI Press.
    Imagine that the United States were to scrap all its income transfer programs—including Social Security, Medicare, and all forms of welfare—and give every American age twenty-one and older $10,000 a year for life. This is the Plan, a radical new approach to social policy that defies any partisan label. First laid out by Charles Murray a decade ago, the updated edition reflects economic developments since that time.

 

  • Parris, K. M. (2016). Ecology of urban environments. West Sussex, U.K.: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    This book provides an accessible introduction to urban ecology, using established ecological theory to identify generalities in the complexity of urban environments. It examines the bio-physical processes of urbanisation and how these influence the dynamics of urban populations, communities and ecosystems. Parris also discusses practical strategies for conserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem services in urban environments.

 

  • Robertson, A. (2015). Media and politics in a globalizing world. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    Globalisation and technological advances have had a dramatic impact on the relationship between media and politics. In Media and Politics in a Globalizing World, Robertson encourages the reader to explore the relationship from different perspectives – those of the politician, the journalist, the activist and the ordinary citizen – and how the relationship between media and politics varies across cultures.

 

  • Rojek, C. (2015). Presumed intimacy: Parasocial interaction in media, society and celebrity culture. Cambridge, U.K.: Polity Press..
    ‘Presumed intimacy’ refers to a relationship that requires instant trust, confidence, disclosure and the recognition of vulnerability. Chris Rojek investigates the impact of relationships of ‘presumed intimacy’, where audiences form strong identifications with mediated others, whether they be celebrities, political personae or online friends. Arguing that the way the media are able to manage these relationships is a significant aspect of their power structure, the core of the book is an investigation into the complicity of the media in encouraging presumed intimacy and the cultural, social and political consequences arising from this.

 

  • Schneier, B. (2015). Data and Goliath: The hidden battles to collect your data and control the world. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
    We cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own making. But have we given up more than we’ve gained? In Data and Goliath, security expert Bruce Schneier offers another path, one that values both security and privacy. He brings his bestseller up-to-date with a new preface covering the latest developments, and then shows us exactly what we can do to reform government surveillance programs, shake up surveillance-based business models, and protect our individual privacy.

 

  • Shambaugh, D. (2016). China’s future. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press.
    China’s future is arguably the most consequential question in global affairs. Having enjoyed unprecedented levels of growth, China is at a critical juncture in the development of its economy, society, polity, national security, and international relations. The direction the nation takes at this turning point will determine whether it stalls or continues to develop and prosper. In this new book, David Shambaugh argues that these potential pathways are all possibilities – but they depend on key decisions yet to be made by China’s leaders, different pressures from within Chinese society, as well as actions taken by other nations. Assessing these scenarios and their implications, he offers a thoughtful and clear study of China’s future for all those seeking to understand the country’s likely trajectory over the coming decade and beyond.

 

  • Shoener, S. (2017). The price of safety: Hidden costs and unintended consequences for women in the domestic violence service system. Nashville, Tennessee: Vanderbilt University Press.
    Through detailed observations of services such as court procedures, public benefits processes, and community-based intimate partner violence (IPV) programmes as well as in-depth interviews with dozens of IPV survivors and practitioners, Shoener describes how our current institutional response to IPV is often not useful—and sometimes quite harmful—for IPV survivors with the least material, social, and cultural capital to spare. For these women, as the interviews vividly record, IPV has long-term economic and social consequences, disrupting career paths and creating social isolation.

 

  • Srinivasan, R. (2017). Whose global village?: Rethinking how technology shapes our world. New York: NYU Press.
    This book asks us to re-consider ‘whose global village’ we are shaping with the digital technology revolution today. Sharing stories of collaboration with Native Americans in California and New Mexico, revolutionaries in Egypt, communities in rural India, and others across the world, Ramesh Srinivasan urges us to re-imagine what the Internet, mobile phones, or social media platforms may look like when considered from the perspective of diverse cultures.

 

  • Sumner, S. (2015). You: For sale. Protecting your personal data and privacy online. Waltham, MA; Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier Science.
    You: For Sale is for anyone who is concerned about what corporate and government invasion of privacy means now and down the road. The book sets the scene by spelling out exactly what most users of the Internet and smart phones are exposing themselves to via commonly used sites and apps such as Facebook and Google, and then tells you what you can do to protect yourself. The book also covers legal and government issues as well as future trends.

 

  • VanRooyen, M. (2016). The world’s emergency room: The growing threat to doctors, nurses, and humanitarian workers. New York: St Martin’s Press.
    Twenty years ago, the most common cause of death for medical humanitarians and other aid workers was traffic accidents; today, it is violent attacks. The World’s Emergency Room: The Growing Threat to Doctors, Nurses, and Humanitarian Workers documents this dangerous trend, demonstrates the urgent need to reverse it, and explores how that can be accomplished. Drawing on VanRooyen’s personal experiences and those of his colleagues in international humanitarian medicine, he takes readers into clinics, wards, and field hospitals around the world where medical personnel work with inadequate resources under dangerous conditions to care for civilians imperiled by conflict.

 

  • Wagner, L. (2016). Diversity and philanthropy: Expanding the circle of giving. California, USA: ABC-CLIO.
    A “one size fits all” strategy is not effective when it comes to philanthropy and fundraising in today’s diversified environment. This book enables nonprofit leaders, board members, staff, and volunteers of nonprofit organisations to better reach diverse populations and incorporate perspectives that increase success by surveying the cultural context for philanthropic action.

 

  • Weiss, T. G. (2016). Humanitarian intervention (3rd ed). Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Press
    A singular development in the post-Cold War era is the use of military force to protect human beings. From Rwanda to Kosovo, Sierra Leone to East Timor, and Libya to Cote d’Ivoire, soldiers have rescued civilians in some of the world’s most notorious war zones. But what about Syria? Why have we observed the Syrian slaughter and done nothing? Is humanitarian intervention in crisis? Is the so-called responsibility to protect dead or alive? In this fully revised and expanded third edition of his highly accessible and popular text, Thomas Weiss explores these compelling questions. Drawing on a wide range of case studies and providing a persuasive overview of the theory and practice of humanitarian intervention in the modern world, he examines its political, ethical, legal, strategic, economic, and operational dimensions to highlight key debates and controversies.

 

  • Xu, J. (2016). Media events in Web 2.0 China: Interventions of online activism. East Sussex, UK: Sussex Academic Press.
    This book is among the first to use a “media events” framework to examine China’s Internet activism and politics, and the first study of the transformation of China’s media events through the parameter of online activism. The author locates the practices of major modes of online activism in China (shanzhai [culture jamming]; citizen journalism; and weiguan [mediated mobilisation]) into different types of Chinese media events (ritual celebration, natural disaster, political scandal). The contextualised analysis of online activism thus enables exploration of the spatial, temporal and relational dimensions of Chinese online activism with other social agents.

 

  • Yang, G. (2016). The Red Guard generation and political activism in China. New York: Columbia University Press.
    Raised to be “flowers of the nation,” the first generation born after the founding of the People’s Republic of China was united in its political outlook and ambitions. Its members embraced the Cultural Revolution of 1966 but soon split into warring factions. Guobin Yang investigates the causes of this fracture and argues that Chinese youth engaged in an imaginary revolution from 1966 to 1968, enacting a political mythology that encouraged violence as a way to prove one’s revolutionary credentials. This same competitive dynamic would later turn the Red Guard against the communist government.

 

  • Zuckerman, E. (2015). Digital cosmopolitans: Why we think the Internet connects us, why it doesn’t, and how to rewire it. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
    In Digital Cosmopolitans, Ethan Zuckerman explains why the technological ability to communicate with someone does not guarantee human interaction or the healthy exchange of information and ideas. Combining the latest psychological and sociological research with current trends both online and off, Digital Cosmopolitans highlights the challenges we face and the headway being made in creating a world that is truly connected.

 

 

Accessing National Library Board Singapore eBooks


Borrowing NLB eBooks using the OverDrive app

You can borrow NLB ebooks, including the 100 reference titles listed above, using the OverDrive app.

You will require the following:

  • Mobile device- Any smartphone or tablet with WiFi / data connection.
  • Your myLibrary ID (Click here to find out how to sign up for a myLibrary ID).

 

How to borrow eBooks via the OverDrive app:

1. Download and launch the OverDrive app.

2. Add NLB in your OverDrive app by tapping the Home menu (top-left corner), then tapping on “Add a library” to search for NLB. (Click here to find out more about adding NLB in the OverDrive app)

3. Click “Sign In”.

4. Enter your myLibrary ID and password to sign in.

5. Browse and search for ebooks of your choice using the search bar.

6. To find out more details about an ebook, click on the book cover of the selected title.

7. If a title is indicated as “Borrow”, it is available. Click on “Borrow” to borrow the ebook.

8. If a title is not available, it will be indicated as “Place a Hold”. Click on “Place a Hold” if you wish to hold on to this title.

9. When you are ready to borrow the ebooks in your cart, click on “My Account”.

10. Then, click the “Download” button to download the ebook, or the “Read” button to read the ebook from your browser.

 

If you’re having problems registering or logging in, please contact us.

 

Authors

Goh Lee Kim
Sharon Teng

 

The information in this resource guide is valid as at May 2017 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history on the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

All Rights Reserved. National Library Board Singapore 2017.

Written by Lee Kim Goh